New Guides on Medication for Opioid Use Disorder (MOUD) for Treatment Court Professionals and Participants

As we enter the second week of Recovery Month, NADCP is pleased to release newly updated and completely redesigned online guides on medication for opioid use disorder (MOUD) in treatment courts. We encourage treatment courts to incorporate these new guides into your everyday operations, now accessible via convenient HTML webpages and also downloadable as PDFs.

The MOUD guides were created through a partnership between experts at NADCP and addiction medicine specialists with criminal justice expertise from the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM). They reflect up-to-date, evidence-based information to support optimal outcomes for justice-involved individuals living with opioid use disorder.

MOUD Clinician guide (digital) F_cover
Clinician Guide
This guide is for clinicians working in treatment courts. It describes how clinicians can help participants benefit from MOUD. Readers of this guide will understand best practices around prescribing MOUD, supporting participants considering or using MOUD, and communicating with treatment court team members about best practices around MOUD.
MOUD Non-Clinician guide (digital) F_cover
Team Member Guide
This guide is for nonclinical team members working in treatment courts. It describes how team members can help participants benefit from MOUD. Readers of this guide will understand best practices around facilitating access to MOUD, supporting participants considering or using MOUD, and communicating with clinicians and other treatment court team members about MOUD.
MOUD Participant guide (digital) F_cover
Participant Guide
This guide provides up-to-date, evidence-based information to help treatment court participants understand and benefit from medications as a part of treatment and recovery management. It's designed for any treatment court participant who has decided or is thinking about including medication as part of their recovery plan. It's also perfect for families and other supportive people (e.g., peer mentors, recovery coaches, peer recovery specialists, sponsors, friends, religious/spiritual mentors) so they can help along the road of recovery.